Tuesday, November 6, 2012

The Need for a Title on the Railroad Cookbook

 We are in the midst of getting the railroad cookbook ready for publication, and that includes the design of a cover and yes, a title.

You would think that we would have settled on one by now, but that is not the case. We've been more concerned with the content and historical trivia that is contained within the handwritten recipes of the journal. But the time has come to start turning our attention to this detail.

So we are asking for opinons!

Here is what we have so far. Let us know what you think and send us new suggestions if you have some.

1. The Roundhouse Cookbook. Recipes of a Railroad Housewife
(problem: no roundhouse in Avis, only the "shops" where the NYC line trains were rolled in and out for repairs)


2. From Rivets and Rails, Recipes of a Railroad Housewife


3. Working on the Railroad, Recipes of a Railroad Housewife


4. From Rivets and Rails, Recipes from a Railroad Boarding House


5. The Cookery Journal of a Railroad Housewife


Thank you! We look forward to your feedback!


 

20 comments:

  1. i read all of your ideas. the only problem i see, as a person who LOVES cookbooks(i read them cover to cover), is that it says Railroad HOUSEWIFE, to me it suggests that its not train food. Is there any other word instead of railroad housewife. I would be drawn to a title that suggest authentic recipes for yester-years railroad ages. Recipes easily duplicated, yet extremely authentic, plus the stories behind them. PICTURES OF THE FINISHED PRODUCT ARE ALWAYS A BIG DRAW ALSO! I find if i see a picture of the food, i am 85% more likely to replicate.

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    1. Actually, most recipes in this cookbook are not what would have been served on the trains, per say, which the exception of the recipe for Railroad Cake.

      My great grandmother served these recipes to her boarders and others who came to her house for meals. Her husband was the superintendent at the railroad shops in Avis PA until his death in 1920. Some of the workers for the railroad would stay at boarding houses like my great grandmother's while they worked away from home for the week or duration of their call.

      Thus, the housewife term..... open to more suggestions!

      I appreciate your feedback!

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  2. I like title one and three best!

    Good luck!

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  3. I like the idea of a boarding house in the title. It makes me think of large home-cooked satisfying meals she would have cooked. Did her boarding house have a name?

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  4. I don't believe it did. Given her connections, it was all word of mouth.

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  5. I love #4. Old Locomotives and boarding houses whistle nostalgia. My two cents are. "Railroad Ties That Bind" and "Whistling Iron Horses." Wishing you the best of luck. Janice :))

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    1. oooh, great suggestions Janice! Decisions, decisions....

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  6. From Rivets and Rails, Recipes of a Railroad Housewife

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  7. I like #1 best - but what about Whistle Stops? I guess they wouldn't have boarding houses associated with those. Did you check Amazon to see if there are other titles already? I'm guessing so. I'd be interested in the cookbook. I have German relatives who made careers on the "Bahn" and could relate to the stories!

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  8. I like Janice's Railroad Ties That Bind.

    If it were drinks, it could be Tie One On.

    Morgan Mandel
    http://www.morganmandel.com

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    1. There are drinks! This woman made her own wine and beer and chocolate syrup! (That counts as a drink in my house!) :)

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  9. I think I'd keep it simple: The Railroad Boarding House Cookbook

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  10. What great suggestions! I think every title has a vote... plus it looks like my options have been doubled! ack!

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  11. Someone's In The Kitchen With Dinah: The Railroad Boarding House Cookbook

    Or, as Bob says, Chew, Chew. LOL!

    Marian Allen
    Fantasies, mysteries, comedies, recipes

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    1. Darn! My great grandmother's name wasn't Dinah! :) It's not even two syllables which might have made a good substitute.

      Plain old Eliabeth (not that she was plain and old.)

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